• Welcome to FracFocus 2.0! We're excited about our latest upgrades designed to dramatically enhance the site's functionality for the public, state regulatory agencies and industry users. Our user-friendly 'Find A Well' chemical disclosure registry now includes more extensive search options.

    FracFocus continues to evolve and expand, adding more participating companies and reported wells from across the country. Our continued success is the result of nationally recognized organizations working with state governments and the oil and natural gas industry to provide public transparency.

    Find Out More
  • This technique uses a specially blended liquid which is pumped into a well under extreme pressure causing cracks in rock formations underground. These cracks in the rock then allow oil and natural gas to flow, increasing resource production.

    Learn More About Casing
  • Casing is the multiple layers of steel and cement inside the drilled hole used to protect water aquifers. The specific length, thickness, strength and composition of casing is regulated at the state level.

    Learn More About Casing
    Illustration Courtesy of the Texas Oil & Gas Association.
  • Use the interactive map to find regulations per state as well as contact information for groundwater protection and oil and natural gas production.

    Find Regulations Now

Groundwater Protection: Priority Number One

Oil and natural gas producers have stringent requirements for how wells must be completed. The genesis of these requirements is water safety.

Casing is the first line of defense used to protect freshwater aquifers.

More About Groundwater Protection »


Find Well

Search for nearby well sites that have been hydraulically fractured to see what chemicals were used in the process.

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FAQs
  • What is Hydraulic Fracturing?

    Hydraulic fracturing, commonly referred to as fracing, is the process of creating small cracks, or fractures, in underground geological formations to allow natural gas to flow into the wellbore and on to the surface where the gas is collected and prepared for sale to a wide variety of consumers.

    During the fracing process, a mixture of water, sand and other chemical additives designed to protect the integrity of the geological formation and enhance production is pumped under high pressure into the shale formation to create small fractures.

    The newly created fractures are “propped” open by the sand, which allows the natural gas to flow into the wellbore where it is collected at the surface and subsequently delivered to a wide range group of consumers.   Read more...

  • What chemicals are being disclosed on this website?

    All chemicals that would appear on a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that are used to hydraulically fracture a well except for those that can be kept proprietary based on the “Trade Secret” provisions related to MSDS found on the Trade Secret link at 1910.1200(i)(1).  Read more...

  • What happens to chemicals after they are pumped downhole?

    Chemicals used in hydraulic fracturng are often transformed or degraded by their interaction with formations and formation fluids.  For many chemicals of concern a recent presentation made by Dr. Angus McGrath of the environmental consulting company Stantec entitled "Fate and Transport of Select Compounds of Interest in Fracing Fluids" describes the fate of chemicals.  It is available on the USEPA website at

    http://www.epa.gov/hfstudy/fateandtransportofselectcompoundsofinterestinfracingfluids.pdf

All FAQs »

1/7/2014 University of Oklahoma offers free course to public

The University of Oklahoma is offering an on-line course on "Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Resources", free of charge to the public.  The course begins January 13th.  You can register for the course at https://janux.ou.edu/landing .  This is a good opportunity to learn more about the process of hydraulic fracturing and the water resources related to the process.

Ground Water Protection Council Interstate Oil and Gas