• Welcome to FracFocus 2.0! We're excited about our latest upgrades designed to dramatically enhance the site's functionality for the public, state regulatory agencies and industry users. Our user-friendly 'Find A Well' chemical disclosure registry now includes more extensive search options.

    FracFocus continues to evolve and expand, adding more participating companies and reported wells from across the country. Our continued success is the result of nationally recognized organizations working with state governments and the oil and natural gas industry to provide public transparency.

    Find Out More
  • This technique uses a specially blended liquid which is pumped into a well under extreme pressure causing cracks in rock formations underground. These cracks in the rock then allow oil and natural gas to flow, increasing resource production.

    Learn More About Casing
  • Casing is the multiple layers of steel and cement inside the drilled hole used to protect water aquifers. The specific length, thickness, strength and composition of casing is regulated at the state level.

    Learn More About Casing
    Illustration Courtesy of the Texas Oil & Gas Association.
  • Use the interactive map to find regulations per state as well as contact information for groundwater protection and oil and natural gas production.

    Find Regulations Now

Groundwater Protection: Priority Number One

Oil and natural gas producers have stringent requirements for how wells must be completed. The genesis of these requirements is water safety.

Casing is the first line of defense used to protect freshwater aquifers.

More About Groundwater Protection »


Find Well

Search for nearby well sites that have been hydraulically fractured to see what chemicals were used in the process.

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FAQs
  • Is my groundwater safe to use?

    This depends upon many factors including:

    1. The level of chemicals in the groundwater; whether naturally occurring or introduced. (NOTE: The Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water was established by the EPA and can be found on their website at: http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/index.cfm .  It is important to note, however, that not all chemicals, compounds or elements have an MCL.  For example natural gas does not have an MCL; and
    2. Your individual tolerance to some chemicals.  While some chemicals such as Benzene can be toxic to everyone in quantities as low as a few parts per billion, the toxicity of other additives depends upon the individual.  For example, some people are sensitive to Sodium due to conditions like high blood pressure.  Consequently, a tolerable level of sodium for them might be lower than for a person without a similar condition.  However, only you and your doctor can determine a safe level of exposure for you.  To see a more comprehensive evaluation of chemical toxicity you should visit the website of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Integrated Risk Assessment System (IRIS); and
    3. The use to which the groundwater is put (e.g. will it be used for human consumption, livestock consumption, irrigation, washing or bathing etc…). 

    The best way to determine if your groundwater is fit for its intended use is to have it analyzed by an accredited laboratory for all constituents of concern and to have that analysis evaluated by a qualified professional such as a toxicologist.  You can often obtain a list of accredited laboratories from your County Extension Agent, State Water Quality Agency or local Health Department.

     

  • Can hydraulic fracturing fluid migrate into a fresh groundwater zone?

    Fracturing fluids can enter a fresh groundwater zone if there is sufficient bottom hole pressure to raise the fluid level from the fractured zone to the fresh groundwater zone, and there is a conduit through which the fluid can flow such as an open annulus between the casing and the formation.  Fluids may also enter fresh groundwater if there is a hole in the casing above the depth of the groundwater zone and the cement outside of the casing is not adequate to prevent fluid flow between the casing and the formation. However, under normal circumstances hydraulic fracturing fluid is confined to the inside of the production casing, the formation being treated and nearby formations. Read more...

  • How do the search forms work?

    There are two search forms available in FracFocus:  Map Search and Standard Search.  The data available to be searched upon (e.g., API Number, Operator, State, etc.) is the same on the two forms.  To avoid conflicts in system resources the search screens will only return the top 2,000 disclosures when a search is performed.  The filtering of data and combination of search criteria will be critical to the user to assure that they have retrieved all the available disclosures desired based on this resource limit.

    Each search form uses a winnowing down process that begins with the largest block of records (State) and works its way down to the smallest block of records (API Number).  For example if you enter just the State the search will return the top 2,000 disclosure records for that State.  If you also selected the county the search will return only those records for the particular State AND County you selected and so forth (up to 2,000 disclosures).  If you entered only the API Number the search will return only those disclosure records submitted for that well.  When using an API Number search please note that this could result in more than one disclosure if the well has been fractured more than once.

    The two search forms have been modified (Available in March 2013) to add three new search criteria to the system:

    1. Date search:  This search will allow you to look for disclosures based on the Start and/ or End date of the fracture job and will include a search of before or after either of these dates, a between dates search for either of the dates or an exact date for either date field. 

    2. Chemical name search:  This search will show you a side by side box with the chemicals for which there are records in the system shown in the left box.  To search by a chemical or chemicals all you need to do is use the > symbol to move one or more chemical names from the left box to the right box.  Performing a search on common chemicals, such as water and hydrochloric acid, which are typically used in all fracture jobs, is not allowed as the result would be to return all of the disclosure records. A limit of 20 selected chemicals can be filtered on at a time.

    3. Chemical Abstract Service number search:  This search will allow you to enter a specific chemical abstract service number (CAS number) and will return up to the top 2,000 disclosures that contain that number.  The advantage to using this search over the chemical name search is that CAS numbers are unique and may represent multiple chemical names.  This search also contains a link to the University of Akron’s chemical database to assist the user in identifying CAS numbers based on chemical names.  Please note that the same search restrictions on common chemicals (e.g., water, hydrochloric acid, etc.) that exist for Chemical name searches also applies to CAS number searches.

    As with all other search criteria only those records meeting all of the conditions you select will be returned in a search. If you are using the Map search the result of the search will be a map showing the location of the disclosures.  You may have to zoom in on the map to see and select individual wells to access the disclosures.  On the Standard search a result list of the disclosures meeting the search criteria will be returned.  You can select a disclosure for viewing by clicking on the pdf icon on the left side of the list.

    In some cases your computer or browser may have security controls which can prevent you from seeing the pdf.  These can usually be overcome by right clicking the orange bar at the top of the page and allowing the file to download if you are using Internet Explorer or by clicking on the  download box which appears at the bottom left of the screen and selecting Keep if you are using Google Chrome.  Other browsers may use different security protocols so please check your particular browsers security restrictions to find out the proper procedure for viewing files.

All FAQs »

10/22/2014 FracFocus Help Desk now available

FracFocus has instituted a Help Desk to address any issues you may have in using the system.  You can reach the Help Desk Monday-Thursday from 8 AM to 5 PM and on Friday from 8 AM to 4 PM CDT at 405-607-6808.

Ground Water Protection Council Interstate Oil and Gas